Invasive Plants

Council Wide Herbicide Review

Council has undertaken an independent review of all herbicide usage with a 6-month trial of alternative herbicides and other weed management methods within Bellingen Shire. The drivers for this project are Council’s commitment to the community and ecologically sustainable development, together with our invasive weed management role.

Download Final Report(PDF, 15MB)

Summary

Bellingen Shire Council (BSC) has an integrated approach to weed management, using herbicides alongside other methods including mechanical and manual removal techniques, biological controls and other bush regeneration activities. Following increasing community concern regarding impacts on human health and the residual environmental impacts of herbicides used for weed management, BSC has resolved to review its use of herbicides. Advisian were engaged by Bellingen Shire Council (BSC) in late 2021 to undertake a review of herbicide use in the BSC Local Government Area (LGA) as well as design and assess the results of an alternatives herbicide trial for the LGA.

The Scope of Works included:

1. A literature review on international and Australian considerations of herbicides in use and trials of alternative herbicide products and methods.

2. Assessment of BSC’s current herbicide use including type of product, quantity used, cost, labour time and areas of application.

3. Stakeholder engagement to identify areas in the LGA of greatest concern regarding herbicide use.

4. A 6-month trial period of herbicide alternative/s at sites identified through stakeholder engagement.

5. A comparison between BSC’s current herbicide practices ((i) above) and the adoption of herbicide alternative practices ((iv) above); and

6. A review of the BSC Pesticide Use Notification Plan (2014) in accordance with findings of (i)-(v) above.

A review was undertaken of herbicide usage within the three main weed management areas of urban, roadsides and bush regeneration within a 12-month period (generally between July 2020- August 2020). Herbicides used by BSC during this period included glyphosate, metsulfuron methyl, triclopyr, picloram and aminopyralid. Methods of application were targeted using cut and paint (metsulfuron methyl) or multipurpose targeted sprays using a backpack, hand spray or powered units. Within urban areas, most weed management was undertaken using mechanical methods with very low volumes of glyphosate applied with a targeted spot spraying application. Similarly, within bush regeneration sites there were minimal herbicides used and only when required. Roadside maintenance had the highest volume of herbicide usage, given the challenges of applying integrated methods over large and often steep roadside areas.

There are also currently few viable alternative methods or products available for woody weeds. A review of herbicide alternatives or alternative methods was undertaken based on case studies undertaken in Australia. Alternative methods that have been previously trialed include organic (acid or oil based) herbicides, alternative synthetic herbicides, other mechanical methods, sodium chloride, flame weeding, steam weeding or alternative application methods (such as wick wiping). A considerable amount of work has already been undertaken to trial and investigate these alternative methods within BSC. While many methods have been integrated into the BSC toolbox approach, there are no alternative herbicide products which have met the four criteria of cost (labour and product), effectiveness, environmental and human health risks. Alternative approaches have also tended to be more suitable for urban type areas and multipurpose treatment of more fragile (non-woody) species.

Stakeholder consultation was undertaken through a survey and workshop to gather feedback on all areas of weed management and also to inform the design of the herbicide alternative trial. The outcome of the consultation was an overview of community concerns which ranged from inappropriate use of herbicides, human health impacts, environment impacts, difficulties in logistics of using alternative methods, risks of glyphosate, lack of effective weed management and applying the lessons learnt from previous trials. The consultation also guided the methods for the herbicide alternative trial.

The herbicide alternative trial was undertaken during Summer of 2021/22 over 12 weeks at Bellingen Waste Depot, Dorrigo Sewage Treatment Plant and Mylestom Tennis Courts, to represent the variety of climate conditions within BSC LGA. The effectiveness of weed treatments (including glyphosate, imazapyr, acetic acid and steam weeding) were assessed on fixed transects and fixed photoquadrats (n=5 per location) with measurements of weed species and percentage cover (%Cover) taken at 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks. A total of 300 photoquadrats were measured in the trial (three locations x four treatments x five photoquadrats). The photoquadrats were used in SamplePoint© software to calculate the %Cover of the main weed categories of grasses, herbs, bulbs, woody and sedges. Multivariate analysis was then used to determine if there was significant effectiveness of the treatments at each location and how long this lasted.

The results of the herbicide alternative trial found the following:

▪ Imazapyr had similar effectiveness to glyphosate in treating grass weeds at Dorrigo and Mylestom but was not very effective on herbaceous weeds. This herbicide has similar short term toxicity as glyphosate but much lower long-term toxicity (based on review of available studies in mammals). This product is a viable alternative for grasses but more expensive (at least five times that of glyphosate based on chemical costs).

▪ Local Safe® (acetic acid) was more effective than glyphosate at reducing herbaceous weed cover at all locations but was not very effective on grass weeds. This product requires more product to be effective and more frequent applications. The costs of using this product (including labour) are at least 10 times that of glyphosate. This product is considered to be viable for herbaceous weeds but more expensive (at least ten times that of glyphosate based on chemical and labour costs).

▪ Steam weeding only provided effective reduction to 3 weeks at Bellingen and Mylestom but had no reduction in weed cover following a second application. The poor results are likely to be related to the higher soil moisture across all locations. Based on this trial, this method would be very labour intensive and may not be as suitable for the region (compared to other Australian locations) given the high rainfall within the Bellingen LGA.

▪ None of the trialed alternative products are considered suitable as a replacement of glyphosate usage in terms of meeting the criteria that are required for a long-term replacement. However, imazapyr and Local Safe® are recommended for inclusion as part of the toolbox approach, particularly in urban areas. 

Based on the outcomes of this review, including stakeholder consultation and the alternative trial, the following recommendations are made to BSC:

1. Herbicide alternatives should continue to be considered where practical, especially in areas of high public use. There are currently no suitable alternatives to synthetic herbicides for large operational areas (such as roadsides) or for woody weeds.

2. Glyphosate should be continued to be used where required (where there are no suitable and practical alternatives).

3. Herbicide ‘no spray’ 20 m exclusion zones are recommended around urban sensitive areas.

4. Provision of education and training for all pesticide applicators including volunteers.

5. Maintain weed profile to assist with management.

6. Consistent pesticide application record keeping and training on how to fill out.

7. Continued review of pesticide usage and weed management options.

8. Revision of Pesticide Use Notification Plan (2014).

 

 

Identification & Control - Biosecurity Act 2015

Invasive Plant Management now falls under the Biosecurity Act 2015 (replacing the repealed Noxious Weeds Act). The term ‘noxious’ and the class system is no longer used. Invasive Plant Management now operates on a priority scale, with state and regional priorities. The Biosecurity Act is tenure neutral, as the responsibilities apply equally to all land holders, whether public or private.

Any land managers and users of land have a General Biosecurity Duty - to ensure that biosecurity risks are prevent, eliminated or minimised so far as is reasonably practicable.

Weeds of the North Coast of NSW - A guide to identification and control

North Coast Regional Strategic Weed Management Plan 2017-2022

PREVENT - Highest priority weeds for prevention and require reporting if found

These species are not known to be present in NSW or the North Coast region. Prevent these weeds from arriving and establishing in the region. Call the Biosecurity Hotline on 1800 680 244 or the Council Invasive Plants Officer on (02) 6655 7300 if you think you have seen these weeds anywhere.

See comprehensive regional list here

Grasses
Ground Layer
Vines & Scramblers
Shrubs
Trees
Aquatics

ERADICATE - Second-highest priority weeds and require eradication if found

These species are either not present or present to a limited extent in NSW or the North Coast region. Eradicate these weeds be permanently removing of destroying all known infestations using the information found on NSW WeedWise. Contact the Council Invasive Plants Officer on 6655 7300.

See comprehensive regional list here

Grasses
  • Aleman Grass (Echinochloa polystachya)
  • Hymenachne (Hymenachne amplexicaulis)
  • Job's Tears (Coix lacryma-jobi)
  • Pampas Grass (Cortaderia selloana)
 Ground Layer
  • Chinese Violet (Asystasia gangetica subsp. Micrantha)
  • Tobacco Weed (Elephantopus mollis)
Vines & Scramblers
  • Leaf Cactus (Pereskia aculeata)
  • Moon Flower (Ipomoea alba)
  • Sicklethorn (Asparagus falcatus)
Shrubs
  • Boneseed (Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera)
  • Cape Broom (Genista monspessulana)
  • Gorse (Ulex europaeus)
  • Green Cestrum (Cestrum parqui) - Exclusion Zone
  • Mahonia (Berberis lomariifolia)
  • Ming Asparagus Fern (Asparagus macowanii)
  • Parkinsonia (Parkinsonia aculeata)
  • Red Cestrum (Cestrum elegans)
  • Scotch Broom (Cytisus scoparius subsp. scoparius)
  • Seeded Banana (Musa spp.
  • Shoebutton Ardisia (Ardisia ellipticaI)
  • Tropical Soda Apple (Solanum viarum)
  • White Blackberry (Rubus niveus)
Trees
  • Black Locust (Robina pseudoacacia) - Exclusion Zone
  • Black Willow (Salix nigra) - Exclusion Zone
  • Broad-leaf pepper tree (Schinus terebinthifolius) - Exclusion Zone
  • Cecropia (Cecropia spp.)
  • Chinese Celtis (Celtis sinensis) - Exclusions Zone
  • Cockspur Coral Tree (Erythrina crista-galli) - Eradication Zone
  • Grey Sallow (Salix cinerea) - Exclusion Zone
  • Honey Locust (Gleditsia triacanthos) - Exclusion Zone
  • Japanese Walnut (Juglans ailantifolia)
  • Paper Mulberry (Broussonetia papyrifera)
Aquatics
  • Alligator Weed (Alternanthera philoxeroides)
  • Kidney Lead Mud Plantain (Heteranthea reniformis)
  • Senegal Tea Plant (Gymnocoronis spilanthoides)
  • Water Lettuce (Pistia stratiotes)
  • Water Star Grass (Heteranthera zosterifolia)

CONTAIN - Third-highest priority weeds and require containment if found

These species have a limited distribution in NSW or the North Coast region. Contain these weeds by preventing the ongoing spread of the species. Use control information found on NSW WeedWise or pickup a handbook from Council to find information on how to proactively manage these weeds.

See comprehensive regional list here

Grasses
  • Giant Reed (Arundo donax)
Ground Layer
  • Asparagus Fern (Asparagus virgatus)
  • Blue Heliotrope (Heliotropium amplexicaule)
  • Glory Lily (Gloriosa superba)
Vines & Scramblers
  • Bridal Creeper (Asparagus asparagoides)
  • Kudzu (Pueraria lobata)
Shrubs
  • Bitou Bush (Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. rotundata)
  • Cha-Om (Senegalia pennata)
  • Devil's Fig (Solanum torvum)
  • Giant Devil's Fig (Solanum chrysotrichum)
  • Groundsel Bush (Baccharis halimifolia)
  • Mysore Thorn (Caesalpinia decapetala)
Trees
  • Leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala)
  • Tacoma, Yellow Bells (Tacoma stans)
Aquatics
  • Hygrophila (Hygrophila costata)
  • East Indian Hygrophila (Hygrophila polysperma)
  • Long-Leaf Willow Primrose (Ludwigia longifolia)
  • Water Hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)

Widespread environmental weed species

These are the lowest priority weeds (from a biosecurity perspective). These species are widespread and unlikely to be eradicated or contained within the broader regional context. Use the control information found on NSW WeedWise or pick up a handbook from Council to find information on how to manage these weeds to prevent them from impacting on key assets.

 

 

 

 

Councils Responsibility

As the local control authority for weeds, Bellingen Shire Council will:

  • appoint and support staff as authorised officers under the Act
  • inspect lands for high-risk weeds and seek compliance with the Act from owners/occupiers
  • educate their communities about weeds risk and best practice management
  • control high-risk weeds
  • submit weeds management records to the NSW government
  • participate in the North Coast Regional Weed Committee

The General Biosecurity Duty as described in Section 22 of the Act will be enforced for Containment priority and higher ranked weed species as described in the North Coast Regional Strategic Weed Management Plan. This will ensure that Council resources are directed to preventing the establishment and spread of the highest priority weeds. 

Council will not undertake control of weeds on non-council managed land, however Authorised Officers will follow up all reports of priority weeds and instigate education and/or enforcement actions as required. 

Disputes between neighbours over the management of plants and non-priority weeds should be directed towards your neighbour in the first instance, if you are unable to come to a resolution the Community Justice Centre can provide mediation as a next step.

Requests for management of plants and non-priority weeds that are of a purely civil nature should be directed through Customer & Business Services as a Service Request.

Council may, in certain limited circumstances, consider allowing the self funded removal of vegetation on public land by concerned persons when removal by council is not currently justifiable on the basis of risk and/or budgetary constraints. Such circumstances may include (but are not restricted to) the pre-emptive removal of vegetation that is highly likely to become a future risk to life or property or the removal of vegetation that is a non-priority/widespread/environmental weed or a nonpreferred species of vegetation.

Council continues to work on control plans, where required, for Containment priority and higher ranked weed species where there are significant infestations on public and private lands requiring coordinated efforts from all stakeholders.

Control Plans

Cockspur Coral Tree - Erythrina crista-galli

Under the Biosecurity Act 2015, land managers have an obligation to address the risks this plant poses. To demonstrate compliance with the General Biosecurity Duty, in relation to this plant, the North Coast Regional Strategic Weed Management Plan 2017-2022 states:

Within the Exclusion zone (Including Bellingen Shire):

Landholder/Land Managers Responsibility

  • The plant is eradicated from the land and the land is kept free of the plant
  • Land managers mitigate the risk of the plant being introduced to their land

 

Councils Responsibility

  • Establish agreed quarantine and/or hygiene protocols
  • Surveillance and mapping to locate all infested properties and maintain currency of exclusion zone and objectives
  • Monitor change in current distribution to ensure containment of spread
  • High level analysis of pathways to identify potential introduction areas and preventative options

Council will be undertaking strategic removal of Cockspur coral trees on public and Council managed lands, starting with trees higher in the catchments along waterways and flood ways which pose the greatest threat for spreading. By starting upstream and working towards the coast, we aim to prevent re-infestation as this species can spread from both seed and cuttings or broken branches.

Council requires landholder co-operation to eradicate this species from their land which will ensure both public and private efforts are maximised, and landholders are discharging their duty under the Biosecurity Act 2015. This includes initial removal and on-going removal of seedlings and regrowth as the seedbank in the soil depletes, replanting with natives is encouraged to outcompete other weeds from taking its place.

 

How does this weed affect you?

Cockspur coral tree can dominate waterways and floodplains where they outcompete native vegetation, reduce food and habitat for native animals, and have a major negative impact on soil stability and nutrient levels. Additionally, the tree has rose-like thorns which can prohibit access and be dangerous to people and animals if thickets are formed.

 

Distribution

In the Bellingen Shire this species is present occasionally and localised in small clusters along the rivers from Darkwood to the Coast. There are numerous trees which appear to have been intentionally planted as an ornamental garden plant, and it is from these plants we are seeing it spread along waterways.  

Because the presence of this plant is limited and localised within our shire, it is reasonable that this species can be eradicated as the cost for public and private landholders to discharge their Biosecurity Duty is not unreasonable – compared to the risk this species poses to the environment, economy, and community if action isn’t taken.

 

Identification and Control

Visit NSW WeedWise for in-depth identification and control information.

Physical removal of seedlings is recommended. Most occurrences in the shire are isolated so spraying is generally not recommended due to the increased cost and volume of herbicide used. Cut stump method is recommended for small to medium trees. For large trees, stem injection method is recommended as described below from the lowest point in a spiral/bric-a-brac pattern up the trunk.

Small cuttings can be put in the green bin, larger cuttings can be burnt (approvals may be required), mulched and composted, or taken to a waste management centre for composting.

Successful weed control relies on follow up after the initial efforts. This means looking for and killing regrowth and new seedlings until the seedbank in the soil is depleted. Using a combination of control methods is usually most successful.

 

Replanting/Revegetation

When planning a good control program, replacement with native species or competitive pastures is vital for long-term weed control. If safe to do so, large trees can be poisoned and left dead standing to continue to provide habitat as other trees grow around it. A revegetation guide including species selection can be found below

Bellinger River Estuary revegetation guide

 

If you spot this weed in the shire, please notify the Council’s Invasive Plants Team. Council will continue to undertake inspections of both public and private lands in the shire to ensure appropriate control is taking place moving towards the eradication of this species.

 

 

Black Locust - Robinia pseudoacacia

Under the Biosecurity Act 2015, land managers have an obligation to address the risks this plant poses. To demonstrate compliance with the General Biosecurity Duty, in relation to this plant, the North Coast Regional Strategic Weed Management Plan 2017-2022 states:

Within the Exclusion zone (Including Bellingen Shire):

Landholder/Land Managers Responsibility

  • Excluding historic plantings, the plant is eradicated from the land and the land is kept free of the plant
  • Land managers mitigate the risk of the plant being introduced to their land

Core infestations (containment) zones;

  • Land managers may retain individual, mature, historic plants if they are at least 100m away from waterways and floodplains, and are being effectively managed to destroy any new plants sprouting from the roots of the parent tree
  • Land managers should consult with their local Council Weed Officer to determine if historic plants on their property meet the above criteria
  • If mature, historic plants senesce, they may not be replaced with new Black locust plants

Councils Responsibility

Within the exclusion eradication zones, Council will;

  • Promote quarantine and/or hygiene protocol
  • Inspect the land, map all known infestations and enforce control where required
  • Implement North Coast High Risk Weed Species, Sites and Pathways Inspection Plan

Within the core infestation containment zones, Council will;

  • Work collaboratively with Regional Weed Committee members and other stakeholders to contain the spread of the weed
  • Manage in accordance with published weed management plans
  • Ensure the weed is being controlled of high risk pathways

Council will undertake removal of any new Black locust trees on public and Council managed lands. When mature, historic plants senesce, they will not be replaced with new Black locust plants.

Council requires landholder co-operation to eradicate this species from their land which will ensure both public and private efforts are maximised, and landholders are discharging their duty under the Biosecurity Act 2015. This includes initial removal and on-going removal of seedlings and regrowth as the seedbank in the soil depletes, replanting with natives is encouraged to outcompete other weeds from taking its place.

Identification and Control

Visit NSW WeedWise for in-depth identification and control information.

Replanting/Revegetation

When planning a good control program, replacement with native species or competitive pastures is vital for long-term weed control. If safe to do so, large trees can be poisoned and left dead standing to continue to provide habitat as other trees grow around it. A revegetation guide including species selection can be found below

Bellinger River Estuary revegetation guide

If you spot this weed in the shire, please notify the Council’s Invasive Plants Team. Council will continue to undertake inspections of both public and private lands in the shire to ensure appropriate control is taking place moving towards the eradication of this species.

 

 

 

Grey Sallow - Salix cinerea

Also known as: pussy willow, grey willow, common sallow, wild pussy willow

Under the Biosecurity Act 2015, land managers have an obligation to address the risks this plant poses. To demonstrate compliance with the General Biosecurity Duty, in relation to this plant, the North Coast Regional Strategic Weed Management Plan 2017-2022 states:

Regional Priority Weed Objective – ERADICATION:

The following weeds are present in limited distribution and abundance in the North Coast region. Elimination of the biosecurity risk posed by these weeds is a reasonably practical objective.

Landholder/Land Managers Responsibility

  • Land managers mitigate the risk of the plant being introduced to their land
  • Notify the Local Control Authority (Bellingen Shire Council) if the plant is found on the plant
  • The plant is eradicated from the land and the land is kept free of the plant
  • The plant or parts of the plant are not traded, carried, grown, or released into the environment

 

Councils Responsibility

  • Implement quarantine and/or hygiene protocols
  • Implement North Coast High Risk Weed Species, Sites and Pathways Inspection Plan
  • Implement North Coast New Weed Incursion and Rapid Response Plan
  • Implement North Coast Weed Biosecurity Inspection and Compliance Procedure
  • Monitor progress towards eradication
  • Raise awareness of plants that must not be sold
  • Inspect nurseries, markets, and roadside stalls and use enforcement where required

 

How does this weed affect you?

Grey sallows form dense stands along the banks of waterways and their roots spread into the bed of waterways. They:

  • outcompete native plants
  • reduce food and habitat for land and aquatic animals
  • reduce water quality (especially when they drop their leaves in autumn)
  • take up large amounts of water
  • change water flows
  • divert flood waters and cause erosion
  • restrict access to waterways.

 

Distribution

In the Bellingen Shire this species is present occasionally and localised in small clusters along the rivers of the Dorrigo plateau. There are suspected occurrences around Rocky Creek, Maynards Plains Road and Coramba Road which are under investigation. It is suspected there are trees which have been intentionally planted as ornamental garden plants, and it is from these plants we are seeing it spread along waterways.

Because the presence of this plant is limited and localised within our shire, it is reasonable that this species can be eradicated as the cost for public and private landholders to discharge their Biosecurity Duty is not unreasonable – compared to the risk this species poses to the environment, economy, and community if action isn’t taken.

 

Identification and Control

Visit NSW WeedWise for in-depth identification and control information.

Physical removal of seedlings is recommended. Most occurrences in the shire are isolated so spraying is generally not recommended due to the increased cost and volume of herbicide used. Cut stump method is recommended for small to medium trees. For large trees, stem injection method is recommended as described below from the lowest point in a spiral/bric-a-brac pattern up the trunk.

Small cuttings can be put in the green bin, larger cuttings can be burnt (approvals may be required), mulched and composted (away from water courses), or taken to a waste management centre for composting.

Successful weed control relies on follow up after the initial efforts. This means looking for and killing regrowth and new seedlings until the seedbank in the soil is depleted. Using a combination of control methods is usually most successful.

 

Replanting/Revegetation

When planning a good control program, replacement with native species or competitive pastures is vital for long-term weed control. If safe to do so, large trees can be poisoned and left dead standing to continue to provide habitat as other trees grow around it. A revegetation guide including species selection can be found below

Bellinger River Estuary revegetation guide

 

If you spot this weed in the shire, please notify the Council’s Invasive Plants Team. Council will continue to undertake inspections of both public and private lands in the shire to ensure appropriate control is taking place moving towards the eradication of this species.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Landholders Responsibility

Due to the topographical and climatic features of the Shire the growth of vegetation is prolific and abundant. Unfortunately not all of this vegetation is desirable.

Current landowners, or when purchasing a property, make sure you are informed and aware of the presence of weeds and your responsibilities as a landowner under the Biosecurity Act 2015. Your beautiful paradise may well be a weed haven - requiring many years of hard work and resources to bring under control.

Ensure you have the capacity to uphold your General Biosecurity Duty (GBD) to prevent, eliminate or minimise the spread of weeds.

Whilst all weeds pose a biosecurity risk and carry a GBD, land managers must prioritise certain weeds to ensure that they direct their limited resources to activities of greatest benefit. The NSW Weed Risk Management System and generalised weed invasion curve are the foundations of weed prioritisation.

We invite you to come into Council for free weed control Information.

 

Selling Plants?

Everyone has a part to play in protecting the biodiversity of out of our beautiful region.

Unfortunately, even the most beautiful and interesting plants could potentially be prevented from sale or trade. Don’t buy, sell or move plants, flowers or foliage that put our region at risk. Ornamental plants and flowers can quickly become invasive, and threaten the survival of hundreds of native plants and animals. 

The good news is – there is a simple and easy way to check the plants you are trading. The NSW WeedWise App identifies weeds of concern in our area and allows you to report them – all at the click of a button!  You can also report to our dedicated Invasive Plants Officer, through our website.

The full list of Weed Plants not to be sold in all or parts of NSW can be found on the Department of Primary Industry (DPI) website

All plants are regulated with a General Biosecurity Duty to prevent, eliminate or minimise any biosecurity risk they may pose. Any person who deals with any plant, who knows (or ought to know) of any biosecurity risk, has a duty to ensure the risk is prevented, eliminated or minimised, so far as is reasonably practicable.

Download a copy of the prohibited plant list here(PDF, 496KB) - as at August 2022

 

NSW WeedWise

NSW WeedWise icon

NSW WeedWise contains key information to help users reduce the impact of over 300 weeds in New South Wales.

Users, ranging from home gardeners and residents to farmers, land managers and weeds professionals, can search or browse weed names (common or scientific); recognise a weed by its physical description and image gallery; and find out about its impacts, where it occurs, how it spreads and its preferred habitat.

Control options are described for each weed and the herbicides registered for control by the Australian Pesticide and Veterinary Medicines Authority are listed, including application rates and techniques, and any minor-use permits that must be complied with.

General, state or regional biosecurity duties under the Biosecurity Act 2015 are displayed for each weed.

NSW WeedWise can be accessed as web pages or as a smartphone app

Android app on Google PlayApple App store

 

Weed and Vegetation Management Program

Council continues to conduct its Weed and Vegetation Management Programs throughout the year. All works are subject to postponement depending upon weather conditions and other unforeseen circumstances.

View the Pesticide Use Notification(PDF, 183KB)

Glyphosate - a chemical to understand(PDF, 2MB)